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Hippies- Counterculture of the 60's

The Drug Scene

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Marijuana joints

Drugs were the foundation of the Hippie movement, and everyone was in on it. The most common drug of choice by hippies was marijuana. A large number of hippies sold pot, usually just enough to make their own smoke free. The Rolling Stones first appearance in the US was the first show where hippies smoked out in the open. Pot was illegal, so the hippies tried to keep it from the police as best as they could. It was the most commonly used drug among the hippies during the 60s.

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LSD blotter paper, a popular way of distributing LSD.

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LSD had an influence on the Beatles music

Another very common drug was LSD, or acid. in the early 60s, it was still legal in the US, so many hippies used the drug, as did many rock bands. LSD was often soaked onto a sheet of paper, then the paper was distributed, people would break off a piece and put it in their mouth to dissolve. Many LSD parties were held during the sixties, and the influence of it was seen everwhere, from the music to books, LSD was a popular subject. Before it was made illegal in 1966, LSD was everywhere. Acid tests became popular, and the first one was held in 1965. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test happened around this time, when during a large gathering, the Kool Aid was spiked with LSD and many people were tripping on acid in a large group. Many influential rock bands, including the Beatles, took LSD during the 60s. LSD was Syd Barrett of Pink Floyd's drug of choice.

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Ecstasy pills.

By the end of the 60s, however, a change occured, and less people were smoking pot. LSD had become illegal, and hippies were now looking for new drugs to test out. Though nothing was quite as popular as LSD, many hippies and rock groups took heroine, ecstasy, and speed. Pot had momentarily lost its popularity and was taken over by these new drugs towards the later years of the 60s.

Kristy Kaczmarek